Skip to content

“The Cultural Playbook” with Dr. Kaye

June 2, 2016

On May 26, 2016 – “The Cultural Playbook” with Dr. Karsonya Wise Whitehead aired from 7:00-8:00p on WEAA 88.9FM, your source for cool jazz and more. The show discusses everything from politics to prose; race relations to the presidential race; parenting to peace studies; Taiwan to Trump; and #BlackLivesMatter to #BlueLivesMatter…if it is important, if it is interesting, if it is happening in your community or around the country; and, if it has your ear, then it has our attention. The script is below and the podcast is also available here–>http://weaa.org/post/cultural-playbook-dr-kaye-wise-whitehead

Bump In: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N46hTSoTuG4

SEGMENT ONE

TOP OF THE FIRST ½ HOUR

This is Dr. Kaye on WEAA 88.9FM your source for cool jazz and more; the voice of the community -and its time for the Cultural Playbook – where we discuss everything from politics to prose; race relations to the presidential race; parenting to peace studies; Taiwan to Trump; and #BlackLivesMatter to #BlueLivesMatter…if it is important, if it is interesting, if it is happening in your community or around the country; and, if it has your ear, then it has our attention. Our topic for tonight is “The Politics of Music” and in our second segment, we step into the Time Capsule and discuss 90s style Hip Hop music and how it has changed. But first: last month Beyoncé released Lemonade –a 12-song 50 minute visual album that chronicles her affair-filled marriage to rapper J-Zay and the world – or at least those who live in Bey’s World stood still. Was this musical innovation at its best or an artist who knows how to shape shift to keep the people’s attention. It’s Thursday with Dr. Kaye and we are talking about Beyoncé, Lemonade, and the politics of music and we want to hear from you Call us at (410) 319-8888, tweet us @kayewhitehead or visit us on our Facebook Page. Let’s get going Baltimore its time for The Cultural Playbook.

AFTER “Beyoncé” Lemonade Music Push In

This is Dr. Kaye –Beyoncé is considered by some to be the biggest artist/performer out there at this moment. She has been called everything from a terrorist to a musical genius and everything that she touches seems to turn to gold and everything includes her albums, her streaming service – Tidal, and her ever expanding world tour. This marriage –or at least the infidelity—has been called a fan loop, a media loop, and a marketer’s dream loo Joining me to talk about it is:

Wendel Patrick: award-winning musician/artist/videographer and innovator With five solo albums to his credit, he is the alter ego of classical and jazz pianist Kevin Gift, and this fall he will be teaching the History of Hip Hop Music Production at The Peabody Conservatory of Music, the first such class in the conservatory’s history.

Dr. Jennifer Williams, is an assistant professor of English and Women and Gender Studies here at Morgan State University;

Nina Bradley is a Doctoral Candidate at Northwestern’s Screen Cultures program in the Radio/TV/Film department

You can join the discussion as well – call us at (410) 319-8888 and tell us what you think about Beyoncé? Are you a part of the Beygency?

Dr. Williams: let’s start with you – can you frame all of the debate around Lemonade?

Wendel: Rolling Stone said that this album reclaims the black female legacy of rock and roll – so what does that mean? And what can we use as a gauge?

Nina: Beyoncé chose to release this as a visual album – how is this different from a music video?

Open Questions

  1. There are many that consider Beyoncé to be the biggest superstar out there at this moment – do you agree with this? And who are we comparing her against?
  2. Marital problems or was this just another way to sell records –particularly given the fact that Beyoncé and Jay Z have always been very private about their relationship?
  3. Let’s talk about the visuals in Lemonade – it has been compared very favorably to Daughters of the Dust – Julie Dash’s 1991 film that is being re-released this year but that is known for its spellbinding visual beauty – how does Lemonade compare?

RESET: If you just joined us this is Dr. Kaye and we are talking about how this is Beyonce’s world and we are all just living in with Wendel Patrick award winning musician and videographer; Dr. Jennifer Williams, assistant professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies here at Morgan; and Nina Bradley, a Doctoral Candidate in Northwestern’s Radio/TV/Film department.

  1. Black Lives Matter resonates throughout the visual album with shots featuring the mothers of Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin – it is black nationalist feminism –so is this simply a marketing scheme – given that this Beyoncé visual album is worlds away –in concept in tone in theme to “I’m a Single Lady”?
  2. Let’s talk about the use of the Malcolm X quote – where he says that black women are the disrespected people in America – how does this sentiment fit into Lemonade or is she trying to be all things to all people?
  3. Hilary Rodham Clinton has been known to name drop Beyoncé on the campaign trail –does that really have an effort on younger voters? Do people really care who Beyoncé supports?

Thank you –Dr. Jennifer Williams, and Nina Bradley – Wendel Patrick is going to stay with us. Up next, we take a look at Hip Hop Politics: Now vs. Then. Stay with us.

SEGMENT TWO

Welcome Back – It’s Dr. Kaye here on WEAA 88.9FM. In 1989, rap performer Chuck D of Public Enemy said that Rap is our invisible TV network. It is the CNN that black people never had.” Its been almost thirty years and we have seen everything from the east coast west coast feud to the rise of gansta rap from Vanilla Ice to President Obama recently dismissing a lot of the music for being “misogynistic and materialistic.”. Is hip hop still relevant as a cultural and social voice? It’s Thursday with Dr. Kaye and we are talking about the politics of Hip Hop and we want to hear from you Call us at (410) 319-8888, tweet us @kayewhitehead or visit us on our Facebook Page. Let’s get going Baltimore its time for part Two of the Cultural Playbook: Hip Hop Politics: Now and Then.

th-3

wallpup.com

Joining us to talk about it is

Wendel Patrick: award-winning musician/artist/videographer and innovator This fall, he will be teaching the History of Hip Hop Music Production at The Peabody Conservatory of Music, the first such class in the conservatory’s history.

D. Watkins is a columnist for Salon. His work has been published in the New York Times, Guardian, Rolling Stone, and other publications. He is the author of “The Beastside,” an essay collection, and “Cook Up,” a memoir.

 

Phinesse Demps is President/CEO of LFP Media; a Free-lance Writer/Promoter and TV and Radio Producer.

 

Phinesse: I will start with you – why was hip hop so relevant in the 80s and 90s?

 

Wendel: The president called the lyrics (and for some of them I do not disagree) misogynistic and materialistic – has this always been a part of hip hop music or has something changed over the last 30 or so years?

 

D Watkins: Let’s talk about the lyrics and about how Hip Hop (at one time) was considered to be the CNN of the ghetto – is it still a relevant cultural and social voice?

Open Questions:

 

  1. Puff Daddy and the family recently launched their tour – I watched them on the Today Puffy, Mace, Ole’ Dirty Bastard, Lil’ Kim singing about Mo Money Mo Problems and I’ll Be Missing You it didn’t have the same effect –is it that rap has gotten edgier?

 

  1. Let’s talk about the homophobia – in the past the lyrics have thrown around the f-bombs but with the advocacy work of the LGBT community – is hip hop starting to catch up with the rest of the country?

 

RESET: If you just joined us this is Dr. Kaye and we are talking about Hip Hop Politics with Wendel Patrick, D. Watkins, and Phinesse Demps – and you call us at (410) 319-8888 and tell us what you think was the greatest Hip Hop album ever.

 

  1. In the early 90s NWA reappropriated the n-word and some of arguing that rappers like Nicki Minaj and Angel Haze reappropriating the b-word –do you think that the gender politics are finally moving in the right direction?

 

  1. The profanity – that is a major criticism of the music –In 2007, Rev Al Sharpton led the March for Decency and Jay Z responded:

 

“And if Al Sharpton is speaking for me,
Somebody get him the word and tell him I don’t approve.
Tell him I’ll remove the curses
If you tell me our schools gon’ be perfect.”

 

But if you remove the profanity aren’t you (in a sense) removing the edge?

 

  1. According to Forbes’ Cash Kings 2013 list, P. Diddy is the richest rapper, and he hardly even raps these days. He rakes in most of his dough off the success Ciroc vodka – does this speak to the fact that rappers (I am thinking of Jay Z, Macklemore, Wu-Tang) are able to cross over?

 

  1. Ok – so what are your top three Hip Hop albums that everyone should listen to:

 

Whitehead’s choices:

The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill with Zion 1998

Run DMC 1984 –with Sucker MCs

2Pac Shakur’s All Eyez On Me 1996 – one of the best of 90s rap music

 

Runner Up: The NOTORIOUS B.I.G. “Ready to Die” 1994 –revitalized NY hip hop

 

Thank you Wendel Patrick, D. Watkins, and Phinesse Demps – Hip Hop Politics!

OUTRO: This has been Dr. Kaye giving you The Cultural Playbook. remember if it is important, if it is interesting, if it is happening in your community or around the country; and, if it has your ear, then it has our attention.

This show is a production of WEAA and was co-produced by Iyore Royalty Odighizuwa and Karsonya Wise Whitehead with Andre Melton on the Board.

 

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: